Equipment (Modems,Gateways)
Modems, Gateways, and Networking Devices
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Metro Ethernet - what kind of handoff?

Were looking into having a large client of ours sign up for ethernet services, and i have seen the Ciena ONT. If we have equipment that supports SFPs, can we get a direct fiber handoff via an SFP fiber module? (we could provide the module). Or must we use the Ciena?
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Re: Metro Ethernet - what kind of handoff?

If your going to supply the fiber module then you can supply an ethernet to fiber tranceiver.  I would do that since it allows for a way to unplug the tranceiver and jack in with a laptop to do testing.   Yes fiber is the future but a copper handoff is still preferable in certain situations, this is one.

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Re: Metro Ethernet - what kind of handoff?

I COULD supply a transceiver/media converter, but either the switch or router (or both) will have SFP slots. This way, i can take x-mode fiber from Comcast straight into the the SFP module, no transceiver required. I tend to take the viewpoint that less equipment is preferable to more.

 

EDIT and to your proposal of "jacking in" with a laptop for testing.... a fiber-to-ethernet media converter (such as this http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/details/?model=MC200CM) would solve that....

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Re: Metro Ethernet - what kind of handoff?

I'm not sure I follow that one, there.    For starters I'll assume your switch is more than 200 meters from the comcast handoff which is why your wanting to use fiber.  Your switch has a gigabit spf slot that you have a spf transceiver plugged into and a fiber line plugged into that.  The other end of the fiber line is hanging where the comcast handofff is.  Your going to have to plug something into the end of that line, either a SPF transceiver or a fiber-to-ethernet transceiver.  Your not reducing the parts count at all.  The only thing you might be doing is making it look a tad bit more "purdy" since with an SPF the "box" is jammed into a slot in the Comcast gear - so the ignorant "pointy haired bosses" that might stumble into the network room in search of the bathroom will see 1 less "black box with the blinkin lights"  And you can fix that one with a big sign on the nework room door saying "THIS IS NOT THE BATHROOM" ;-)

 

Electrically, sure there might be one less conversion - but at the cost of having a piece of Comcast gear that when it breaks down and the Comcast tech shows up with a laptop with a copper ethernet port on it to troubleshoot, your going to be digging around for your MC200CM fiber-to-ethernet external transceiver for him to plug into his laptop - which will just give him one more "box" to claim "must be broken" when he can't figure out why the Comcast handoff is broken....

 

Use the MC200CM with a 1 foot ethernet cable to the Comcast handoff and your good...

 

And if the router IS right next to the Comcast gear, well all I can say there is the decision to use SPF on the router or switch is more for "braggin rights" than anything else... ;-)

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