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Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

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ojosdelgato
Visitor

Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

I'm trying to figure out what I can do for my situation. Comcast Business gave me a Netgear CG3000DCR modem. I'm a web designer and integrate clients ebay, paypal, etc to there websites. In the past I would just change my IP address to keep client accounts separate. With residential Comcast I was able to just change my  router Mac Address to get a new IP address. I'm trying to figure if I can do this with Business Comcast. I called to get the Netgear router bridged.  The rep said he could bridge my Modem but I would have to buy a static IP. I also ordered a Motorola Surfboard 6121. I was also told that if I use another modem I would have to get a Static IP. Either way a static IP doesn't help me. What are my options regarding this.

ojosdelgato
Visitor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

guess no reply here

Community Manager
Community Manager

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hi ojosdelgato.  The Netgear can be placed in bridge mode. Comcast does not utilize fixed static IP address on bridged devices. By placing the Netgear device in bridge mode all router functions are disabled, giving you the same functionality provided by the Motorola 6121.

Kwisatz
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Is the motorola 6141 supported?

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hello Kwisatz,

 

The SB6141 is a supported Comcast customer owned modem. However, Comcast does not support any Comcast Static IPs on any non-rented Comcast Internet modem. The only Comcast maintainabiliity or serviceability support on any customer owned modem would be to insure the correct Comcast boot file was being loaded for the actual Internet Tier speed purchased. 

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hello again,

 

Here is one potential networking solution for your consideration:

 

Connect your Web-Development system to one of the standard Enet port(s) of a standard (wireless) Controlling Router or Firewall (CRF). Then you can use the CRF specific configuration software for your internal DHCP i.e. 192.168.1.XXX addresses including the full security aspects. There is(are) usually configuration faciliity(ies) within these CRF devices to change the MAC address(es) as a direct function of assigning it to a 192.168.1.XXX address, which I interpret from your initial post is what you want to achieve. Lastly, you will need to disable the Netgear 3000 internal DHCP to avoid your CRF DHCP routing conflicts. This aforementioned scenario works well with such web development tools such as DreamWeaver, for instance.

 

Hope this help you out. Smiley Happy   

Kwisatz
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

So, If I have static IP's, I can't buy my own Comcast approved modem, even though it would still get the correct bootfile and be managed by Comcast, and work no differnt than a rented modem, for which Comcast gets money for.  That is the very definition of racketeering...

 

What am I missing here?

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hello again,

 

Comcast is not authorized to login to your customer owned modem or to configure Comcast Static IPs on a customer owned modem. Comcast does not charge anything for the modem(s) they provide for your internet service. The 9.95 equipment fee covers the overall maintainability and serviceability of all your Comcast provided equipment, coax cabling at your business. 

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP



 

Comcast does not charge anything for the modem(s) they provide for your internet service. The 9.95 equipment fee covers the overall maintainability and serviceability of all your Comcast provided equipment, coax cabling at your business. 


seems a little contradictory there, don't you think? and come on, how much "maintaining" and "servicing" does coax cable require? it's a modem rental fee.

 

personally i'm siding with Kwisatz here. not saying it's racketeering, but I don't understand why I can't outright BUY the SMC/Netgear/whatever is needed for static IPs, and not keep paying monthly for a box that essentially is unchanged from my point of view. heck, have Comcast charge me everytime they have to login to it per my request, which on average is less than once a year.

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hello train_wreck,

 

There are many situations where Comcast coax cabling requires maintainabiliity some of which are:

1. Squirels nawing on pole to business wiring and exposing conductors where signaling control or data transmission is distorted
2. Inclement weather like icestorms, tonados, heavy snow, etc. forcing replacement

3. Transportation accidents knocking down telephone poles, Nodes forcing replacement. 

4. Female coax connectors do not have a high MTBF especially if being high frequency on/off forces replacement
5. Trucks going through business lots ripping down cables 

6. Customer business expansions, service location movement, etc.

 

Lastly, Comcast Provided Modems (CPM) have specialty Comcast firmware that the same Customer Owned Modems (COM) do not. These same COMs only have the inherent manufacturers retail firmware. Comcast can still provide the COM specific boot file for Tier specific service requirements to access the Internet. This is one of the many reasons as to why Comcast will not load its Comcast Static IPs into customer owned modems. Comcast has an obligation to its Static IP Blocks allocation commision for secure and controlled handling and can only implement this through Comcast provided modems/gateways. 

 

Kwisatz
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

ok, what i don't understand though, forget the Customer owned modem part for now...why can't I rent just a modem from Comcast business and use my own router with static IP's, instead of having to use another router and "hack" the config to "kinda act like" a bridge...this makes no sense from a business standpoint...I am more than willing to rent a modem from Comcast business, just so long as it doesn't have extraneuos configs on it I need to account for...

Kwisatz
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP


@VBSSP-RICH wrote:

"Comcast has an obligation to its Static IP Blocks allocation commision for secure and controlled handling and can only implement this through Comcast provided modems/gateways. "

 


Then rent me just a modem and let me manage my static IP's on my own router...

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hello Kwisatz

 

Apparently I am missing some detail somewhere wrt your business requirement because:

1. When you rent a modem/gateway from Comcast, this entitles you to purchase your dedicated business Comcast Static IP 1,5, or 13 block.

2. When this Static IP block is loaded, configured, and implemented into your Comcast modem/gateway, the Static IP gateway address and subnet mask becomes the conduit into your Comcast regional Static IP controller device. It also uses specialized protocol to continously authenticate your Comcast Static IP gateway.

 

3. You manage installation of your routable 1,5, 13 Static IP address(es) on any router, VPN, firewall, DVR, webserver, etc. that you chose to use with your business network.

 

4. If you also choose to management your entire intra-network security through a firewall/controlling router , then by all means,  you can simply configure the device's front end WAN network interface with static routable IP, gateway, and subnet mask, and DNSs addresses.

 

5. By choosing to control your intra-network security, this usually means that your firewall/router backend DHCP server will serve dynamic IP address to intra-network computers, network printers, etc.  This will require you to simply disable the internal Comcast modem/gateway DHCP server to avoid DHCP conflicts.

 

There is no "hacking" of any Comcast modem/gateway or firewall/controlling router because the aforementiioned is pretty standard network configuration and implementation.

Please let me know if I am missing something pertaining to your business requirement. TIA 

Kwisatz
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

I guess the part I'm confused about is the requirment to rent one of the approved gateways when using static IP's when I just want a modem/bridge.  The "hacking" I refer to has to do with the current CG3000DCR router that is provided me, and the Comcast prescribed method of just turning off DHCP, Firewall, etc. to provide a psuedo brdige mode...I've seen this listed multiple locations, please correct me if I'm wrong...

 

My simple question is can I just rent a Cisco/Linksys DPC3008 or Motorola SB6141, and use it with my static IP block, and have my router manage the block of IP's?

 

Thanks

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

 

Please see my responses below.

 

" I guess the part I'm confused about is the requirment to rent one of the approved gateways when using static IP's when I just want a modem/bridge.  The "hacking" I refer to has to do with the current CG3000DCR router that is provided me, and the Comcast prescribed method of just turning off DHCP, Firewall, etc. to provide a psuedo brdige mode...I've seen this listed multiple locations, please correct me if I'm wrong..."

 

If you choose to use your firewall/router for intra-network security and control the DHCP dynamic addresses, then to avoid conflicts you must remove one check mark to disable disable the Comcast modem/gateway DHCP server. That's it,  because your Comcast modem/gateway staticIP firewall  is automatically disabled when the StaticIP configuration file is dowloaded.

 

"My simple question is can I just rent a Cisco/Linksys DPC3008 or Motorola SB6141, and use it with my static IP block, and have my router manage the block of IP's?" 

 

Sorry but the answer is no. Comcast does not provide SB6141 rented modems and the DPC3008 does not support Comcast static IPs. Currently the only DOCSIS 3.0 rented modems that support Static IPs are SMCD3G and Netgear CG3000DCR. There is a new Comcast version of the CISCO DPC3939B coming down the pike and this will support 4 ports wired 1G, 2.4 Ghz and 5.0 Ghz public Xfinity WIFI Hotspot, and customer private 2.4 Ghz and 5.0 Ghz WIFI.  This new Business Wireless Gateway device will not support any telephone capability at all.  

Kwisatz
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Ok...I think we're getting closer...why don't you rent the 6141? That new Cisco gateway has even more features I don't want or need...I've seen that the netgear can be put into true bridge mode....what does that take?
tfirma
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

So how do we configure this modem to be in bridge mode?  I just got one of these today - it really messed up the rest of my network configuration - the tech claimed there was nothing he could do?   Would very much appreciate any steps I can use to configure this device as a Bridge only.

 

Thank you

Tom

Kwisatz
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

It's my understanding that only Comcast tech support can put it in bridge mode, but i've seen elsewhere where it says can't be used with static IP's aquired from Comcast, I'm trying to get confimration of exaclty what can and cannot be done with the Netgear, seeing as they apparently won't rent businesses just modems.

tfirma
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

When I was having my "new" modem installed yesterday, there were two separate techs that had to come out to try and configure it.   Even knowing that this new device was casuing havoc on our setup with other wireless routers, cameras, etc. (which worked perfectly fine before) the answer was, 'Most businesses have an IT department - and they take care of figuring out how to configure your devices".   I am a small business - the IT guy (me) is the same guy who sweeps the floors (me).   I respectfully asked if they had anyone at Comcast that knew how to configure the device in bridge mode (having read about that online while they were here) and they brushed me off saying they wouldn't be able to do that for me - they feel the issue is in my equipment and it's not their problem.    Very, very disappointing to have everything working as of yesterday morning - then I'm told I need a new gateway which costs $10 more per month if I want to maintain high speed service - AND THEN after installation nothing works and they say "not our problem".       Besides the on-site tech, the one tech I talked to over the phone said they could possibly turn off DHCP to the modem, but I don't think that sounds like the same thing as turning on bridge mode...?  

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hello Tfirma,

 

If you have a Firewall and/or Controlling Router (FCR) using Comcast static IP(s) and either of these are providing your intra-network's DCHP and overall security, then you can easily setup your Netgear CG3000DCR in psuedo-bridge mode as follows:

 

1. Connect any computer to one of the available LanPorts 1-4 , bring up a browser and enter in the address field 10.1.10.1 then return

2.  You should see a login screen with default username=cusadmin and password=highspeed.

 

3.  Click on User LAN link, then click on enable DHCP server the check mark to uncheck and this will disable DHCP, then click apply button. 

4. Lastly, click on the User firewall link to insure that there is a check mark next to disable Static IP firewall. This will ensure pass-through for any and all associated routable static IP devices. 

Hope this helps you out. 


 

tfirma
New Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hello Rich -

 

Thank you SO much for your awesome response.   I really appreciate the time you took to write those steps!

 

I'm slightly embarassed to write that I'm not 100% sure if I have a Comcast static IP or not.   Comcast insisted I should be a business account, even though I'm essentially a one-man shop, and not as adept at router configurations as I would like!    Still, I was able to perform all of the steps you wrote, but still had problems using my own router.   Not sure if it helps - but I have an Airport Express.     I do follow your logic behind why turning off DHCP on the gateway might help - but not sure why things still don't work.   (After these steps - it looks like the gateway wasn't even connected to the Internet).   

 

I *think* the Airport Express does, in fact, operate as the Firewall/Controlling Router/DHCP device....  but the static IP part is what through me off....  Any further ideas or suggestions?   Again, thank you very much for taking the time to respond!   Smiley Happy

 

Tom

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

if you look at your bill, it will say whether you have a static IP or not - it will be typically a $9-$10 charge. If you're not running any kind of servers or remote access-type utilities that benefit from a non-changing ("dynamic") IP address, you can safely cancel the static IP. It will remove the charge from your bill. As well, if you are renting a modem, then you can return it, as Comcast allows customer-owned modems with dynamic IP addresses, even on business class accounts.

 

And judging by the amount of problems people seem to be having with that Netgear modem, you might be better off returning it!

Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Putting Netgear CG3000DCR Bridge mode without Static IP

Hello again tfirma,

 

I am happy that my response was useful. However, as train_wreck mentioned you can determine if you have a Comcast static ip address by your billing statement (under Internet Service you will see 1 static ip = 14.95, 5 static ips = 19.95 or 13 static ips = 34.95) and/or you can login to your Comcast gateway (using a Enet wired computer/laptop/notebook/tablet directly connected to any LanPorts 1-4, bring up a browser, use address 10.1.10.1, username=cusadmin & password=highspeed, click on gateway summary link and if you have a static IP it will state the StaticIP gateway address. Please let us know if we can be any further assistance to you..... regards Smiley Very Happy

 

  

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