Equipment (Modems,Gateways)
Modems, Gateways, and Networking Devices
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New service - which modem to get?

I'm going to be setting up a new business Internet service (Internet only - no voice) and I'm planning to buy my own modem. Is there any consensus on the "best" model to get? I'm thinking of the SB6141 - it's just under $90 on Amazon with free Prime shipping and seems to be the defacto standard, if there is one. BTW, my criteria for "best" are "least likely to cause problems for the Comcast staff". I don't need a router (already got an FVS538) and I don't need WiFi (already have several Ubiquiti APs). All I want is a dumb box to bridge (literally) Cat5 to coax.


Any other pitfalls with customer supplied modems that I should be wary of?

 

BTW, can anybody confirm or deny that Comcast will/will not support static IPs on customer owned modems? I've seen conflicting statements about this, and it doesn't seem to be well documented.

 

Oh, and does anybody know if it's possible to do a self install for business class if I supply the modem and the cable drop already exists? Or is it always required to pay for a tech visit, even if there's nothing for him to do?

 

 

 

Thanks! Bob

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Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: New service - which modem to get?

-On the modem, the Surfboard SB6183 is technically a better option than the 6141, though there is certainly nothing wrong with either one. The SB6183 can bond 16 downstream channels, whereas the 6141 can only bond 8.

 

-No, you cannot use static IPs with any customer owned modem. You must lease one from Comcast.

 

-Yes, a tech visit is always required for install, even if drop is in place and signals are good.

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Re: New service - which modem to get?

Is the only difference that the 6183 has more bandwidth? If that's the case then I'll probably just go with the cheaper one - I'm not planning to sign up for the 100Mbps service... Thanks
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Re: New service - which modem to get?

The difference is in the total amount of bonded channels the modem is capable of. More bonded channels does mean more total aggregate bandwidth available, but it also means better reliability if, for example, there is RF noise on 1 channel but not others. In MOST cases you shouldn't notice a difference, but in a noisy/intereference-prone cable system, the 6183 could keep you working where the 6141 would do less well.

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