Equipment (Modems,Gateways)
Modems, Gateways, and Networking Devices
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kc7gr
New Contributor

CG3000DCR - Multiple questions

It has come to my attention that the SMC 8014 business gateway has been replaced by the Netgear CG3000DCR. With this in mind, I have several questions.

 

 

(1) I've seen some (lightly) used CG3000DCR's come up on Ebay every so often. If I purchase one of these units to replace my current SMC box, and turn said SMC box back into Comcast, can I FINALLY stop paying the %*@#&#$%)*(&! monthly 'modem rental' fee?!

 

 

(2) Along these same lines: Does Comcast offer a customer purchase option for the Netgear box?

 

 

(3) Is the Netgear unit rack-mountable? The photos I've seen suggest it is, as it appears to be in the same form factor Netgear has used for other of their rack-mountable hardware.

 

 

(4) I've seen references to two models: CG3000DCR and CG3000D. Are there actually two models, or is this just someone getting lazy about typing the last couple of letters? (5) How does the Netgear compare to the SMC, in terms of performance and reliability?

 

 

Thanks in advance.

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5 REPLIES 5
Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: CG3000DCR - Multiple questions

(1) No, NEVER buy any modem off of Ebay. Many of them are stolen/not returned, and Comcast will refuse to activate them.

 

(2) No. I wish to high heaven they did.

 

(3) No. It does not have mounting holes on the side (though you may be able to drill some, if you feel like getting down & dirty)

 

(4) The CG3000D is a combo unit with WiFI, and as far as I know Comcast isn't renting this out to business class customers.

 

(5) I will personally say from experience that the Netgear has had numerous problems throughout its history (there is indeed a sprawling thread in this forum about it.) Technically, it should perform better than the SMC8014, but the consensus is that at the moment, the SMCD3G and the Cisco DPC3939B are the top contenders; i've used both, and can recommend both highly.

 

(I've also heard, through the backchannels of tier 2, that the Netgear was a problematic device from the get-go, and that it will be phasing out soon. No idea if that's trustworthy, though Smiley Wink )

kc7gr
New Contributor

Re: CG3000DCR - Multiple questions

Yeah, I suspected as much. Thanks for the detailed response! Open question for Comcast: So why is it residential users can own their modem and business users can't? Perhaps I should ask the Washington State AG's Consumer Protection unit to look into this question, hmmm?
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Community Manager
Community Manager

Re: CG3000DCR - Multiple questions

Hi kc7gr.  Business customers can utilize their own modems with their Business Services.  Here is the link to the 

approved devices list.  However as was stated by Forum Member train_wreck, devices that are listed as stolen or unreturned Comcast equipment will not be activated on the network.  Also per Comcast policy Public Statip IP addresses will not be provisioned/configured onto Small Business  (SMB)  Customer owned equipment.  train_wreck thank you for the spot on input.  

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kc7gr
New Contributor

Re: CG3000DCR - Multiple questions

It's not the point business users can, if they wish, use their own modem. It's that, if they do, Comcast will not provision static IP addresses.

 

 

This restriction seems, to me, silly at best. If Comcast is truly worried about abuse, they need to find a better way to handle it than locking business customers into a device which will be paid off in (most likely) a little over a year, yet one which we get charged $10/month for in perpetuity.

 

 

I have no idea if Comcast is simply trying to (sneakily, if true) make up for lost monthly rental revenues, from residential self-owned modems, and those of business owners who don't use static IP's, or if there's some larger aspect in play. All I know is I see a situation which I believe is not fair, and I'm going to do whatever I can to fight it.

 

 

The one thing I cannot do, in good conscience, is to stay silent. I recognize you don't set policy, John, and you've certainly been extremely helpful with any sort of technical issues. However, my complaint to the consumer protection unit of my state's AG office stands, as filed.

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Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: CG3000DCR - Multiple questions

i believe the official word is that for static IPs, Comcast uses RIP to authenticate static IP enabled modems & securely route static IP traffic to/from those modem. Apparently, this necessitates Comcast renting out "special" modems to do this.

 

As to why this functionality couldn't be built in to retail modems, or at the very least have the BCI modem be a one-time charge instead of a monthly rental charge (does it really continually cost Comcast money every month just to have these modems sitting there, in the field?) , im just as perplexed as you.

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