Connectivity
Connectivity and managing Your Comcast Business network
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madmann26
New Contributor

Would like some clarification...

As a previous and unsatisfied business customer, I am being forced to look at business service again because we are moving soon.

 

Can someone answer me the following questions:

 

1. Is the packet-loss problem strictly related to the Netgear modems?

 

2. Can I provide my own business class modem?

 

3. If the packet-loss is still a problem with the Netgear modems, does the problem occur when the modem is placed in true-bridge mode?

 

Thanks in advance. 

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6 REPLIES 6
Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Would like some clarification...

Hello madmann26 and welcome,

 

Answer 1: I know of MANY business class customers that utilize the NetGear CG3000 (NG3K) IP Gateway successfully all having the correct internetworking.

 

Answer 2: Yes, you can check out this website for supported Business Class modems by using the Business Tier gage, drop blue ball to your speed and view the list of suppported modems below. Comcast does not support customer owned modems COMs) and only insure that the correct boot file is loaded. If you have any hardware/software issues you must seek technical support by the COM manufacturer. Lastly, Comcast does not support Comcast Static IPs on COMs.

 

Answer 3: The NG3K works just fine in direct DHCP, Static IP, or Tru Bridge Mode.

 

Hope this helps you out.

 

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Forum Contributor

Re: Would like some clarification...

madman, the Netgear packet loss issue appears to be related to CPU starvation on the Netgear - the people posting in these forums with problems with it have tended to be the higher throughput customers.  It IS the only modem in Comcast's lineup that appears to properly support dynamic IPv6, however.  But still some people do say it worked for them.

 

As a general rule you can reduce CPU utilization by running a device in bridged mode, as well as shutting off any wireless transmitter that may be in it, as well as only plugging into ONE ethernet port on the device.  (if you have multiple PCs plug them into a gigiabit switch then plug a port of that switch into the cable modem.)

 

I run an SMC and have had no problems with throughput issues on it.

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Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Would like some clarification...

I can confirm what tmittelstaedt is saying. I personally saw the Netgear drop packets on customers with 75/15 or 100/20 speed tier subscriptions, while those with 16/3 speeds generally didn't see it. The Cisco DPC3939B is a very adequate replacement, at least if you are only concerned about wired throughput; I have it running on both my personal systems and at customers locations with absolutely no problems.

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Forum Contributor

Re: Would like some clarification...

As long as you don't want Chromecast, apparently the Cisco device has a problem with it.

 

Truthfully, the best way to do this is to run the modems in bridged mode so your aren't dealing with all the crappy code bugs in the modem.  But, the bridged mode in modems that support a static IP subnet isn't a true bridge mode.

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madmann26
New Contributor

Re: Would like some clarification...

Thanks everyone,

 

So in short, I can run in bridge mode, provide my own firewall or router or just get a Cisco business class modem?

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Trusted Forum Contributor

Re: Would like some clarification...


@madmann26 wrote:

Thanks everyone,

 

So in short, I can run in bridge mode, provide my own firewall or router or just get a Cisco business class modem?


You can run in bridge mode only if you do NOT have a static IP, although if you don't have a static, you could just  purchase your own cable modem to use with your own router; that way you can also potentially save on the ~$12 rental fee.

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