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49 Messages

Thu, Jul 16, 2015 4:00 AM

How to disable DHCP ipv6 on Cisco DPC3939B? DNS settings?

I need to do a new fresh install of Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials on a new small office server.

I need the server to be my Domain Controller and DHCP (not the router).

Before installing, I need to disable DHCP of both ipv4 and ipv6 on the router.

Obviously ipv4 is straight forward, but ipv6 is NOT.

I am not at the router right now, so cannot remember the exact settings, but I think BOTH Stateful and Stateless were checked? I don't know what these mean and is quite easily confusing.

EDIT:

Stateless (Auto-Config) is checked (but grayed out, cannot change?)

Stateful (Use Dhcp Server) is checked

BOTH Assign DNS manually for IPv4 and IPv6 are UNCHECKED..  should these be checked and filled in with exactly what?  IPv6 entries are obviously crazy here..have NO idea what to do with IPv6.

Something about Stateful being like static? And Stateless being like DHCP? Is this correct?

What should exactly be set here to disable DHCP ipv6?

I think the first setting to the far left was grayed out but checked.

Do I even need to mess with the router's ipv6 to have the Server to DHCP and as a DC and for Active Directory? I understand that it is time to start using ipv6, so not sure I need to be cutting all that off? But do not understand ipv6.

Also, while in here, do I need to set the DNS MANUALLY also? And for BOTH ipv4 and ipv6?

What primary and secondary DNS servers do u enter here?

Do I enter the dns of my server address as primary? And maybe secondary as google's 8.8.8.8 or openDNS dns? Or do the Comcast dns go here? I.e. 75.75.75.75?

Or do I setup up a forwarder to the the comcast primary & secondary dns on the WS2012R2E server?

Thank you for any help.

Tim

 

EDIT:

DOCSIS Software Version: dpc3939b-v303r204217-150321a-CMCST

Software Image Name: dpc3939b-v303r204217-150321a-CMCST.p7b
 
Model: DPC3939B
Vendor: Cisco
Hardware Revision: 1.0
 
Edit:
Adding a screen shot of the router config (current default settings):
DPC3939B.jpg

Responses

Forum Contributor

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306 Messages

6 years ago

 

The reason IPv6 is taking so long to catch on is because of a catch 22.

 

As long as there's someone out there who isn't dual-stacked, then the main sites on the Internet are forced to

make both IPv6 and IPv4 available.

 

As long as the main sites on the Internet are offering both, people have no incentive to make IPv6 work on their

networks.

 

At least you spent the time to look into what IPv6 is, most don't even do that.

 

Comcast's focus on IPv6 on it's current Business Gateways has been to make it work out of the box from a "client perspective"

 

Meaning, if your business site is nothing more than a bunch of workstations in "Microsoft Workgroup-style networking", with the Business Gateway as the default router, and maybe a cheap SOHO nas or something - then it works out of the box with the person setting it up not having to know anything about -either- IPv4 or IPv6.

 

Microsoft, themselves is also having a lot of problems getting their arms around what the future of the SOHO market is going to be.

 

Server 2012 Essentials is an attempt to respond to the SOHO market - but truthfully, it's coming at that market from a very old-school perspective.  Essentials is basically a product where they took a little bit of SmallBusinessServer 2011, a little bit of Microsoft Home Server, and stripped out everything at all complicated.   But, the achillies heel here is that Essentials makes an assumption that everything on the network is going to be a Windows client machine.

 

That assumption is changing at the speed of light as Android and other mobile computing platforms make their way into the SOHO network.

 

None of us in the business have any clue what SOHO is going to look like in the next decade.

 

As a business owner, you probably spent $500 per PC for 10 machines, totalling $5,000.  Then you dropped $1000 into a server, and $200-a-pop into MS Office licenses, so that around $8,000 in basic Windows Office software and a little fileserver that can tie all of them together.

 

But, there's SOHO offices out there who are dropping $250-per-pop into Android convertible tablets, and getting 10 licenses of Office 365 - grand total cost of $2,500 for hardware, grand total cost of $150 a month for the subscription - and they have the same functionality that you do.  (to a point)   That's $4,000 for the year vs your $8000.  And, not only can each of their employees run Office 365 on their "desktop/laptop" convertible Android tablet - they can have the same desktop experience on their ipad, and their home Android tablet, and if they are walking down the street and their tablet slips out of their hands and falls down a sewer grating, they can walk into Target and buy a new tablet and 15 minutes later are right back on their desktop.  And some of these businesses are going 100% BringYourOwnDevice - which I think is long, long overdue.  I never could understand why it is that a car mechanic who makes $60K a year working on cars is expected to buy $20K of his OWN TOOLS while an office worker making $40K a year cannot buy their own laptop for $500.

 

At least, that's the promise of the Cloud.  Maybe the reality isn't quite there yet - but it's coming.

 

Microsoft and the rest of us techs simply do not know right now if the SOHO market is going to adopt that model or the niggling issues associated with that model are going to cause SOHO to stick with the old-school model.

 

It could even end up a hybrid where the SOHO mixes both cloud and old-school.

 

THAT's really why your having problems.  Essentials is far, far, far from a mature, time-tested product.  It is a bridge product that may not even exist 5 years from now.  We just don't know.  Microsoft just does not know.  If the market rejects Essentials, then it's over.  Microsoft does not continue to develop dog products.

 

There are things going on in the industry, large things, that are dictating what you are seeing when you click through the setup screens.  Comcast has to design their Business Gateways and their network to respond to what they think the majority of SOHO's are going towards.  They obviously have chosen a "cloud-ish" perspective because absolutely for sure, their Business Gateways are NOT AT ALL friendly to people wanting to setup their own servers.

 

I understand where they are coming from - there's a LOT MORE c"lient-ish" setups out there - they have to design for the majority - but that won't keep me from squawking when something is done on one of these Business Gateways (like the IPv6 PD bugs) that is unfriendly to a site wanting to run their own servers.

Member

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49 Messages

6 years ago


@tmittelstaedt wrote:

 

 

Meaning, if your business site is nothing more than a bunch of workstations in "Microsoft Workgroup-style networking", with the Business Gateway as the default router, and maybe a cheap SOHO nas or something - then it works out of the box with the person setting it up not having to know anything about -either- IPv4 or IPv6.

 

 


Well.... that wasn't my intentions at all.  Would be NO reason to even look at Essentials if I threw all my equipment into a WORKGROUP pile.  That's just the wrong way to do this for business... fine for residential...but not my plans.  My plans are Active Directory and a DOMAIN.  I've gotta lock down the employee user workstations.  I can have them going WILLY NILLY as Eli the Computer Guy says.

 

I've got Essentials, I've got my server, I've got everything...  I can't worry about this too much or nothing will ever get done.  I persoanlly think Essentilas is just fine for my needs... I honestly HATE the Cloud... I know it benefits you mention...i am one that doens't need or fall for those so called benefits.  It's just a good way for software developers to get more money in a much better predicted way.  I am not going to get into that..  back on track here...

 

I appreciate your help, but you are on a MUCH higher level than I when it comes to this stuff... i.e. you mention DUAL-STACK like it's nothing...  I had NO IDEA what DUAL-STACK was the first time I heard it a week ago...  I searched and watched videos about it...  total chaos in my mind.  just didn't get it.  Then I asked for a SIMPLE explanation of it here, train_wreck came to the rescue.  So the thing is I understand a lot of what you are saying (after researching etc), but man, some things, I have NO CLUE...so I get LOST again.  You eat & breath this stuff.  I do not...getting a good taste of it though! ; )

 

It's pretty simple my problem, I just want to make sure Essentials is CONFIGURED correctly at first install.  I know how to do everything in Essentials using the DASHBOARD...eezy breezy...  I can fumble around SERVER MANAGER with AD, DNS, and DHCP.  But appparently, Essentials during install, then the config wizard sets up everythign automagically correct?

 

That is where I am at, pretty simply.

 

I can enter the information let it do it's thing. easy.

 

BUT.  FROM WHAT I WAS TOLD IN THE BEGINNING!  TURN OFF ALL DHCP ON THE ROUTER!

 

OK.  SIMPLE for IPv4.

 

From you PROFESSIONAL experience, what should I do next?  Do as you say and UNCHECK Stateful correct and do not mess with anything else.  I just want to make sure that my network setup is correct when Essentials does it autoconfig stuff.  Then I won;t have to mess with DHCP, scopes, DNS forwarders etc correct?  Remember, Essentials was supposed to be easier for the newbies like me.

 

Keep in mind, I just want the server set up correctly and for the future.  i.e. if IPv6 isn't supposed to be OFF or removed etc etc, then what needs to be done to keep it working as it should?  Again, I was told to turn off all DHCP on router and let the SERVER do all DHCP.  Simple as that...that's all I am asking for pretty much.  Nothing more really.

 

Thank you.  Your help is truly appreciated.

 

PS.  Just thinking about something.  If I turn off IPv4 on the router.  Then just leave the defaults for IPv6 as is on the router.  Is this all I need to do for Essentials to do it's thing?  The server would be able to assign IPs via DHCPv4 on it's own.  And does IPv6 just do things automatically from the router and no need to set anythign up on the server for DHCPv6?  i.e. no scopes, not nothing...just leave it as is?

 

I am just really stuck at this point with IPv6, DHCPv6 and the router / server settings.  I just need to know what people are doing at this step.

 

 

Member

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49 Messages

6 years ago

Here is something I wish I had found at the start...wish it was more specific though... i.e. what does Essentials do if it detects DHCPV4 disabled on router but not DHCPv6?

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj200151.aspx

 

https://technet.microsoft.com/library/jj200119.aspx

 

 

Member

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49 Messages

6 years ago

To tmittelstaedt:

Your replies are very helpful. It's me just having a hard time getting my head around this... but I am re-reading and re-reading what you've said and I slowly understanding the details your expressing...so thank you.

Forum Contributor

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306 Messages

6 years ago

"...Would be NO reason to even look at Essentials if I threw all my equipment into a WORKGROUP pile.  That's just the wrong way to do this for business... fine for residential...but not my plans.  My plans are Active Directory and a DOMAIN.  I've gotta lock down the employee user workstations.  I can have them going WILLY NILLY as Eli the Computer Guy says..."

 

There are many many different network configurations out there.  For example I have 1 customer who is running a business management information system program that does not work unless the program has administrative access to the PC.  So essentially every user is an admin on their PC.  There go all the benefits of a domain right out the window.

 

I have another one who is a 50-workstation windows network that is in workgroup-style networking and they have refused to even consider setting up a domain server.  Every system is windows 7.  Everyone is an administrator on their PC also.  Why are they like this?  Because they are cheap and any time an employee wants to install any kind of software they need, the business owner encourages them to install it and save the cost of an IT service call.

 

Microsoft, today, doesn't really understand the SOHO market anymore.  Their MO is to build these SOHO products - like Server Essentials - that they think would be Best practices for a SOHO to be doing - then throw them out into the market along with a lot of documentation saying how to use them - then cross their fingers and see if the SOHO market buys 'em.  Maybe the market will accept them, maybe not.   But, it's been many years since Microsoft actually spent time paying attention to what the SOHO really wants - because the A #1 thing the SOHO wants is "less cost" and Microsoft goes deaf when they hear that.

 

What your posting here about workgroup mode being the wrong way to do this for business is straight out of the Microsoft-written documentation on How To Setup A Windows Network For A Business.   I'm not saying that your wrong or that Microsoft is wrong.  But, I'm saying that there is a huge SOHO market that has a large number of orgs in it that are simply ignoring those instructions and not doing it that way.   And, there's other companies and other products in the SOHO market that help them to do it.

 

If you subvert the Microsoft recommendations, your business network doesn't just automatically burn down into a pile of rubbish.  Both my everyone's-and-admin customers have successful businesses that make money.  Their network problems are really no worse than anyone else's.  And I am positive that Microsoft is uncomfortably aware of this fact even though they pretend it isn't true.  That's why they hedge their bets in the SOHO market and are trying these days to wheedle along their customers rather than pushing anything.  They still to this day, release security updates for Windows XP and there's a 5 minute registry change you can make to an XP system to get 'em.  So despite their public huffing and puffing about everyone needs to go to Windows 10, privately they are still winking-and-nodding about the realities of the SOHO market.

 

But, getting back to your problem:

 

"...

From you PROFESSIONAL experience, what should I do next?  Do as you say and UNCHECK Stateful correct and do not mess with anything else.  I just want to make sure that my network setup is correct when Essentials does it autoconfig stuff.  Then I won;t have to mess with DHCP, scopes, DNS forwarders etc correct?  Remember, Essentials was supposed to be easier for the newbies like me

 Just thinking about something.  If I turn off IPv4 on the router.  Then just leave the defaults for IPv6 as is on the router.  Is this all I need to do for Essentials to do it's thing?  The server would be able to assign IPs via DHCPv4 on it's own.  And does IPv6 just do things automatically from the router and no need to set anythign up on the server for DHCPv6?  i.e. no scopes, not nothing...just leave it as is?

I am just really stuck at this point with IPv6, DHCPv6 and the router / server settings.  I just need to know what people are doing at this step..."

 

If Essentials's installer is properly written then unchecking Stateful on DHCP6 on the router is all you should need to do on the IPv6 side.  If it was me, I would also uncheck DHCP for IPv4 on the router because I would want to force the Essentials server to act as a DHCP server - because Essentials is going to be a better DHCP server than the router.  What SHOULD then happen is during the installation Essentials should ask for the router's IPv4 IP address, and it's own IPv4 address, and you would put in the 10.0.10.1 IP address of the Cisco as the default gateway (or whatever the IP address of the Cisco is).  Essentials should also ask for the DNS servers and you would put in the Comcast servers 75.75.75.75/75.75.76.76

 

Then everything should properly set itself up.  Essentials should set itself up as the IPv4 DNS and DHCP server and it should automatically configure DNS forwarders and your good to go.  And IPv6 will  Just Work.

 

If that does NOT happen when you do that, then tell us what DOES happen.

Member

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49 Messages

6 years ago


@tmittelstaedt wrote:

 

 

But, getting back to your problem:

 

"...

From you PROFESSIONAL experience, what should I do next?  Do as you say and UNCHECK Stateful correct and do not mess with anything else.  I just want to make sure that my network setup is correct when Essentials does it autoconfig stuff.  Then I won;t have to mess with DHCP, scopes, DNS forwarders etc correct?  Remember, Essentials was supposed to be easier for the newbies like me

 Just thinking about something.  If I turn off IPv4 on the router.  Then just leave the defaults for IPv6 as is on the router.  Is this all I need to do for Essentials to do it's thing?  The server would be able to assign IPs via DHCPv4 on it's own.  And does IPv6 just do things automatically from the router and no need to set anythign up on the server for DHCPv6?  i.e. no scopes, not nothing...just leave it as is?

I am just really stuck at this point with IPv6, DHCPv6 and the router / server settings.  I just need to know what people are doing at this step..."

 

If Essentials's installer is properly written then unchecking Stateful on DHCP6 on the router is all you should need to do on the IPv6 side.  If it was me, I would also uncheck DHCP for IPv4 on the router because I would want to force the Essentials server to act as a DHCP server - because Essentials is going to be a better DHCP server than the router.  What SHOULD then happen is during the installation Essentials should ask for the router's IPv4 IP address, and it's own IPv4 address, and you would put in the 10.0.10.1 IP address of the Cisco as the default gateway (or whatever the IP address of the Cisco is).  Essentials should also ask for the DNS servers and you would put in the Comcast servers 75.75.75.75/75.75.76.76

 

Then everything should properly set itself up.  Essentials should set itself up as the IPv4 DNS and DHCP server and it should automatically configure DNS forwarders and your good to go.  And IPv6 will  Just Work.

 

If that does NOT happen when you do that, then tell us what DOES happen.


Great!  Thank you!  I will try this next and let you know if this satisfies my small dilemma here.  Thank you tmittelstaedt for hanging in there with me... very grateful for your help and KNOWLEDGE. ; )

 

 

 

PS.  IN "LAYMEN's" TERMS, can you tell me what is going on "SIMPLY" when STATEFUL is CHECKED and when it is UNCHECKED? (Stateless obiviously cannot be toggled here, stays checked as stateless no matter).

 

I get from your previous posts that STATELESS is auto configuration using SLAAC (STATELESS Auto Address Config).  So not sure what scenario this is best for?  is this when you have certain type of IPv6 devices?  some smart, some dumb or something?

 

Then I get STATEFUL has soemthing to do with m and o flags.  Not sure the benefit where setting it as STATEFUL comes into effect?  When Comcast starts handing out IPV6 static IPs, (or if I need to use DynDNS or NO-IP) does this get set to unchecked? (for later reference).

m flag off o flag stateless

both flags stateful

both flags off = no dhcp server

 

I just don't really no how those flags get set etc.

 

Thank you!